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First Annual Report

Center for Heritage Resource Studies
University of Maryland, College Park
Dr. Paul Shackel, Director
Dr. Donald Jones, Assistant Director
January 2002
Contents

 

Executive Summary
Center Mission

Mission Statement

Goals

Center Personnel

Center Staff/Faculty

Partner Organizations

Affiliates

Center Programs

Debate Forum

Research

Education

Public Outreach

Outside Center Funding

Current Research Projects

Grant Proposal Assistance

Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Awards

Continuing Education Programs

Appendices

Appendix A:  Ten Objectives for the Center

Appendix B:  Advisory Workshops

Appendix C:  Shared Heritage and Conflict Resolution

Appendix D:  Belgium Study Abroad Program 2002

Appendix E:  Center Brochure and Website

Tables

Table 1.  List of Current Center Research Projects

Table 2.  Center Grant Proposal Assistance Awards

Table 3.  Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Awards

Table 4.  Past and Scheduled Continuing Education Courses

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Executive Summary

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Founded in December 2000, the Center for Heritage Resource Studies at the University of Maryland—College Park was formed to bring scholars and practitioners together to support a comprehensive approach to the study of heritage.  The Center provides a forum for exchanging ideas, provides educational and professional training opportunities, conducts research projects associated with all aspects of heritage resource studies, and is developing various public outreach efforts.  This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of the Center during its first year.

First, a summary of the Center’s mission, goals, objectives are presented; ten objectives for meeting these goals are presented in Appendix A.  Second, in addition to the Director and initial faculty members, the Center hired an Assistant Director on a part-time basis and has developed a series of partnership agreements and affiliate members.  The Center also plays a key role in developing partnerships with education institutions, professional associations, non-profit organizations, and businesses that have similar research interests.  List of current Center staff, partners and affiliates are presented in this section.

Third, Center activities and projects have been divided into four major program categories (debate forum, research, education, and public outreach).  Brief summaries of current projects and activities are provided in each program section.  The Center also has been active in supporting the development of cooperative research projects related to heritage studies, which are listed in this section.  Fuller descriptions of selected projects and activities are presented in a series of appendices.  These include two Center advisory workshops (Appendix B), the “Shared Heritage and Conflict Resolution” training course, part of the Wye River People-to-People Exchange Program (Appendix C), the Belgium Study Abroad Program (Appendix D), and the new Center brochure and website (Appendix E).

Lastly, summaries of current Center funding sources and Center-assisted activities are presented in a series of tables listing grant- and contract-funded research projects (Table 1), grant proposal assistance provided by the Center for projects that will lead to enhanced Center research opportunities (Table 2), assistantships for University of Maryland graduate students (Table 3), and continuing education programs (Table 4).

The Center is temporarily located at 1111 Woods Hall, University of Maryland—College Park.  The Center’s new website can be found at www.heritage.umd.edu.  This first annual report was prepared by Donald G. Jones, Assistant Director, with the assistance of Dr. Paul Shackel, Director.

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Center Mission

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies at the University of Maryland has developed a mission statement, justification for this mission and five broad goals for reaching this mission, each of which are presented below.  In addition, the Center developed ten broad objectives to reach these goals, which are presented in Appendix A.

Mission Statement

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To bring scholars and practitioners together to support a comprehensive approach to the study of heritage—an approach devoted to understanding the cultural characteristics of heritage resources to promote the protection, responsible development, and uses of those resources.

The establishment of the Center for Heritage Resource Studies recognizes that the sustainability of our cultural and environmental resources is dependent upon understanding the ways in which heritage is defined, expressed, and used to further economic development and political activity.  Furthermore, it is critical that research and educational efforts conducted and sponsored by the Center be formulated in a way that can be readily applied by those who are responsible for the management of our historic, cultural, and environmental resources.  In this manner, the activities of the Center for Heritage Resource Studies will contribute substantially to an increased awareness of the need for responsible heritage development.

Goals

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies brings scholars and practitioners together to support a comprehensive approach to the study of heritage.  Through such collaborations, the Center is creating an increasingly visible and more vibrant program in the Department of Anthropology.  The Center intends to become an internationally recognized leader in heritage resource studies devoted to understanding the cultural characteristics of heritage resources to promote the protection, responsible development, and uses of those resources.

The Center has five primary goals:

1.   To conduct, sponsor, and support research projects that demonstrate the societal and cultural importance of heritage in today’s fast-changing world;

2.   To draw on the unique and diverse skills in the Department of Anthropology and Center partners and affiliates to establish heritage projects;

3.   To integrate disciplinary interests in heritage and reinforce existing interests of faculty and Center/Department partners;

4.   To provide education and training for students and professionals in heritage research, advocacy, and program development and implementation; and

5.   To disseminate information on our work through various media in order to build a broader constituency for heritage resource studies, heritage preservation, and heritage management.

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Center Personnel

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Center staff initially includes scholars from the Department of Anthropology.  Center core personnel is supplemented and enhanced through the development of partnerships with other departments, institutions, agencies, and organizations, and through affiliation with recognized individual leaders from a wide range of academic and applied fields.  We are continually working to develop new partnership agreements and enlist additional renowned affiliates.  Current Center staff, partners, and affiliates are listed below.

Center Staff/Faculty

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Director
Paul A. Shackel (Ph.D), Associate Professor of Anthropology

Assistant Director
Donald G. Jones (Ph.D.), Faculty Research Associate

Faculty Members
Mark P. Leone (Ph.D.), Professor of Anthropology
Erve M. Chambers (Ph.D.), Professor of Anthropology
Michael Paolisso (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Partner Organizations

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During its first year, the Center developed a number of partnership arrangements and has been working to broaden our partnership base.  Most of the current partnerships serve to provide enhanced research and educational opportunities provided by the Center, including the development of grant and contract-funded activities.

University of Maryland Partners

American Studies Department
Baha’i Chair for World Peace
(Dr. Suheil Bushrui)
Center for International Development
and Conflict Management

Center on Population, Gender and Social Inequality, Department of Sociology
Historic Preservation Program, School of Architecture
Office of Continuing and Extended Education
Study Abroad Office

State and Regional Partners

Catoctin Center for Regional Studies, Frederick  Community College, Maryland
Historic Annapolis Foundation, Annapolis, Maryland
Maryland Historical Trust, Crownsville, Maryland
Maryland State Highways Archaeology, Project Planning Division
National Park Service, Center for Cultural Resources, Valley Forge
National Park Service, National Capital Region, Regional Archeology Program
Shenandoah Center for Heritage and the Environment (Virginia)

URS Corporation (an international private corporation)

National Partners

Society for American Archaeology

International Partners

Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Preservation, Belgium

Affiliates

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The Center expands its intellectual reach and research and educational opportunities across the globe through its affiliate program.  The Center for Heritage Resource Studies is pleased to have the following individuals as Center Affiliates.  Please note that affiliation extends only to the individual, unless the Center has a partnership agreement with the affiliate’s institution (see above).  The home institution of each affiliate is provided here for informational purposes only.

Brian Alexander
President & CEO, Historic Annapolis Foundation

William Bechhoefer
School of Architecture, University of Maryland

Ben Blount
Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia

Peter Brosius
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia

Suheil Bushrui
Baha’i Chair for World Peace, University of Maryland

Dirk Callebaut
Executive Director, Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation, Belgium

Wayne E. Clark
Executive Director, Office of Museum Services, Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum

Elaine Eff
Director, Cultural Conservation Program, Maryland Historical Trust

Barbara Franco
Executive Director, The Historical Society of Washington, DC

Dean Herrin
Catoctin Center for Regional Studies, Frederick Community College, Maryland

Mary Hufford
Director, Center for Folklore and Ethnography, University of Pennsylvania

David W. Inouye
Graduate Program in Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology, University of Maryland

Barbara J. Little
Archeology and Ethnography Program, National Park Service

Randy Mason
Director, Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, University of Maryland

Francis P. McManamon
Director, Archeology and Ethnography Program, National Park Service

Stephen R. Potter
Regional Archeologist, National Park Service, National Capital Region

Stephen D. Prince
Director, Mid-Atlantic Regional Earth Sciences Applications Center,
University of Maryland

Peter Stone
International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies, United Kingdom

Jack Sullivan
Landscape Architecture Program, University of Maryland

Edvard Thorsett
Director, Shenandoah Center for Heritage and the Environment

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Center Programs

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies was established to bring scholars and practitioners together to support a comprehensive approach to the study of heritage.  To that end, the Center’s research and educational efforts are formulated in a way that can be readily applied by those who are responsible for the management of our historic, cultural, and environmental resources.  In this manner, the activities of the Center will contribute substantially to an increased awareness of the need for responsible heritage development.

The Center has four primary program categories to help achieve these goals:

·         Debate forum;

·         Research;

·         Education; and

·         Public outreach.

Each of these program categories is described below, with selected activities highlighted.

Debate Forum

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The Center provides a forum for debate about and investigation of a variety of heritage issues through workshops, lectures, seminars, publications, and possibly a web-based list-serve.  The purpose of the debate forum is to provide scholars and practitioners with the opportunity to share their views, concerns, and experiences directly with each other, serving to bridge the gap between academic and applied fields.

As part of this program, the Center for Heritage Resource Studies held two advisory workshops during 2001 with participants from the academic community (September workshop) and professional, governmental, and non-profit organizations (December workshop).  The workshop participants helped solidify the Center’s mission statement, organize the Center’s various programs into discrete categories, and develop a draft five-year plan for fulfilling the Center’s mission and objectives.  This plan (currently in development) concentrates on substantive issues, physical staffing infrastructure, and funding concerns.  Summaries of the two workshops are presented below.  More detailed descriptions of the workshops can be found in Appendix B.

September Workshop (Academic Community)

The Center for Heritage Resource Studies hosted its first Advisory Workshop September 6-7, 2001.  Invited participants were:

·   Ben Blount (Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia);

·   Peter Brosius (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology,The University of Georgia);

·    Anabel Ford (Director, ISBER/MesoAmerican Research Center, University of California—Santa Barbara); and

·     Mary Hufford (Director, Center for Folklore and Ethnography, University of Pennsylvania).

University of Maryland participants were:

·    Stewart Edelstein (Associate Dean);

·    Paul Shackel (Director)

·    Don Jones (Assistant Director)

·    Erve Chambers (Professor)

·    Mark Leone (Professor)

·    Michael Paolisso (Assistant Professor); and

·    Anthropology graduate students Kris Beadenkopf, Stacy Hockett,
Teresa Moyer, Rosemary Riel, Sara Rivers, and Kate Shaffer.

The Center’s first Advisory Workshop generated lively discussion and debate on heritage issues and various roles the Center may serve in the field of heritage studies.  In addition, the participants assisted with the development of a proposed five-year plan for the Center.  A report on the workshop subsequently was compiled and submitted to all workshop participants; the report is on file at the Center administrative offices.

Second Advisory Workshop (Applied)

A second advisory workshop was held December 7, 2001.  The participants invited to this workshop were individuals who work in various applied anthropology and heritage fields.  The invited participants were:

·    Michael Cernea (Social Development, The World Bank);

·    Elaine Eff (Maryland Historical Trust);

·    Barbara Franco (The Historical Society of Washington, DC)

·    Randall Mason (Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, University of Maryland);

·    Frank McManamon (Archeology and Ethnography Program, National Park Service); and

·    George Smith (Southeast Archeology Center, National Park Service).

University of Maryland participants were:

·    Stewart Edelstein (Associate Dean);

·    Paul Shackel (Center Director);

·    Don Jones (Center Assistant Director);

·    Erve Chambers (Professor, Department of Anthropology);

·    Mark Leone (Professor, Department of Anthropology);

·    Michael Paolisso (Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology); and

·    UMD Anthropology graduate students Jennifer Babiarz, Brandon Bies, Joanna Church, Stacey Hockett, Rosemary Riel, Amanda Ritchie, and Kathryn Shaffer.

As with the first workshop, these questions generated lively discussion and debate on heritage issues and various roles the Center may serve in the field of heritage studies.  In addition, the participants assisted with the development of a list of priorities toward the development of a five-year plan for the Center.  A report on the workshop is being prepared and will be submitted to all workshop participants upon its completion.

Research

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The Center both conducts and supports research projects covering all aspects of heritage.  The research interests of the principle Center members range from archaeological research to cultural landscapes to socio-cultural community investigations and tourism.  The Center conducts grant- and contract-funded research projects, supports research endeavors for other faculty and graduate students, and provides limited funding to support grant-writing activities for Center-related projects.

Members of the Center staff are well established in the fields of heritage and natural resource management and are recognized on an international level for their research.  The Department of Anthropology has strong and dynamic programs in public archaeology, heritage tourism, and resource management, with an emphasis on both cultural and natural resources.  All of these programs have ties to local, state, and federal institutions as well as private corporations and non-profit organizations.

In addition, the Center has created successful partnerships with these groups and will continue to link with other agencies and organizations that have similar goals.  The Center builds on these strengths to promote excellence in teaching and research, to establish productive relationships with local, state, and federal agencies and institutions, and to further our mission to become a national and international leader in heritage resource studies.

Faculty Research

Some of the current research projects being conducted by or through the Center describe the breadth of issues being investigated.

·    Mark Leone’s laboratory for historical archaeology houses many ongoing project files from his work in Historic Annapolis, and a Geographic Information System (GIS) Laboratory;

·    Michael Paolisso’s research on the Chesapeake Bay focuses on differing views of heritage held by various stakeholder groups affected by natural resource management issues

·    Paul Shackel has conducted a number of research projects that share a common focus—using archaeology to commemorate struggle and resistance—including projects at Harpers Ferry National Historic Park, Petersburg National Battlefield, and elsewhere; and

·    Erve Chambers has studied issues of tourism in Thailand and is currently working on similar research on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

 Recently funded faculty research include the following projects:

·    Using collaborative learning, cultural models, and dialogue to advance co-management planning of the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Fisher (Paolisso and Chambers)

·    Developing cultural consensus and cultural models of environment on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore (Paolisso and Chambers)

·    Preliminary research related to tourism and heritage in Delmarva (Chambers)

·    Technical support for a proposal related to the development of a heritage resource center in Front Royal, Virginia (Chambers)

·    Archaeological investigations at the Bannaker-Douglass site in Annapolis (Leone)

·    Research, oral history, and archaeology at Wye Hall in Queen’s County (Leone)

·    Archaeological investigations at Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Shackel)

·    Researching and compiling an administrative history for Harpers Ferry National Historic Park (Shackel)

Center Partnership Research

In addition to research projects conducted by Center faculty, the Center grants limited financial assistance to other researchers to assist in the development of research projects that will be administered through, conducted in partnership with, or otherwise associated with the center.  Some of these projects include

·    Research on historic African-American churches in Frederick County with the Catoctin Center for Regional Studies (Frederick Community College);

·    Development of a cultural resource geographic information system database (also with
the Catoctin Center);

·    Proposal development for the Shenandoah Center for Heritage and the Environment, a planned public archive and interpretive center at the Avtex Industrial Site in Virginia.

Education

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The Center is committed to providing professional and continuing educational opportunities in the field of heritage resource studies.  The Department of Anthropology offers a Masters in Applied Anthropology through which students gain unparalleled opportunities for internships and employment in a variety of heritage resource-related organizations.  Working with the Office of Continuing and Extended Education and the Study Abroad Office, the Center offers courses and training seminars both on- and off-campus.  Our courses are taught by University of Maryland faculty and Center affiliates and partners from a broad range of heritage management agencies and organizations.

Recent and upcoming educational programs our listed below.

·    Archaeology and Heritage in Flanders, Belgium, a cooperative summer study tour with the Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage, Belgium, conducted in Summer 2001 and being offered again in Summer 2002;

·    Professional Training Courses offered in association with the Society for American Archaeology

·    Geographic Information Systems (April 2001, New Orleans)

·    Writing and Managing Federal Contracts (April 2001, New Orleans)

·    People Management (March 2002, Denver); and

·    Shared Heritage and Conflict Resolution, being offered Summer 2002 at the University of Maryland for Israeli and Palestinian archaeologists and community members as part of the Wye River People-to-People Exchange Program (a U.S. State Department grant to the University of Haifa Israel), in association with the University of Haifa, the Palestinian Association for Cultural Exchange, and the Ename Center (Belgium).

More detailed descriptions are provided for the Wye River grant project in Appendix C and the Belgium Study Tour in Appendix D.

We are working to expand our course offerings and educational opportunities, including the development of a certificate training program.  We currently are pursuing partnerships with the following organizations and institutions:

·    National Park Service, for training and development service wide on cultural resource stewardship;

·    The World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development, for training heritage management professionals, planners, and tourism officials from developing countries;

·    The Society for American Archaeology (professional association) and the American Cultural Resource Association (business association) to expand course offerings for cultural resource management.

The expansion of our existing educational programs and, significantly, the development of a certificate training program are expected to provide the Center with increased visibility and funding.

Public Outreach

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies reaches interested members of the public through lectures, seminars, conferences, publications, the World Wide Web, and fieldwork opportunities.  As the debate forum will help bridge the gap between those working the academic and applied fields, the Center’s public outreach program will serve to bridge the gap between professionals and the interested public, particularly in areas such as heritage development and tourism.

Our initial public outreach efforts have included the following:

·    Creation of a Center brochure;

·    Development of a new Center website (see Appendix E); and

·    Initial participation in various associated email “list serves”.

Additional outreach efforts in development include popular publications (articles for newsletters, tourism journals, etc.), a lecture and/or workshop series, and development of continuing education courses tailored to various groups including teachers, tour planners, etc.  Also, Center staff will be meeting with representatives of cultural resource management firms in the region to help develop graduate and professional education courses.

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Outside Center Funding

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The Center has received initial financial support from the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Graduate School at the University of Maryland.  In addition, the Center conducts and supports research projects as part of its numerous activities, provides support for proposal development for Center-related research projects, seeks graduate assistantships (internships) opportunities for graduate students, and offers continuing education courses.  The Center is actively working to develop several new grant-funded research projects and educational courses.  Information on each of these funding categories is presented in tables below.

Current Research Projects

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The projects listed in Table 1 are grant-funded research endeavors currently being conducted through the Center.

Table 1.  Current Center Research Projects

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Principal

Project

Agency

Paolisso
Chambers

Using collaborative learning, cultural models, and dialogue to advance co-management planning of the Chesapeake Bay Blue Crab Fisher

Maryland Sea Grant College

 

 

 

Paolisso

Gender, Family and Work in Maryland’s Blue Crab Fishery

Center on Population, Gender, and Social Inequality, University of Maryland

 

 

 

Chambers

Preliminary research related to tourism and heritage in Delmarva

University of Maryland General Research Board

Chambers

Technical support for a proposal related to the development of a heritage resource center in Front Royal, Virginia

Shenandoah University (for the Shenandoah Center for Heritage and the Environment)

 

 

 

Shackel

NPS-NCA 19:  Archaeological identification and evaluation study, Monocacy National Battlefield Park

National Park Service—National Capital Area

Shackel

NPS-NCA 20:  Archaeological backlog cataloging, Phase IV

National Park Service—National Capital Area

Shackel

NPS-NCA 21:  Archaeological compliance report completion

National Park Service—National Capital Area

Shackel

NPS-NCA 22:  Archaeological site management information system, Phase III

National Park Service—National Capital Area

Shackel

Administrative History for Harpers Ferry National Historic Park

Catoctin Center for Regional History

 

 

 

Leone

Archaeology in Annapolis Project:  Mitigation at the Banneker-Douglass site

Maryland Humanities Council

Leone

Archaeology in Annapolis Project:  Documentary research, oral history, and archaeology at Wye Hall in Queen’s  County

Private landowner

 

 

Grant Proposal Assistance

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The Center annually provides small levels of funding to Center faculty, partners, and/or affiliates to assist with proposal development for projects associated with the Center.  Some projects may include extensive involvement by Center staff or University of Maryland graduate students.  Others may involve technical and administrative assistance by the Center for projects that help fulfill the Center’s mission.

All projects for which the Center provides grant proposal assistance are expected to have some level of financial return to the Center.  The principal investigators who received grant proposal assistance from the Center during this past year are listed in Table 2.

Table 2.  Center Grant Proposal Assistance Awards

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Principal

Institution

Project

Dean Herrin and Paul Shackel

Catoctin Center for Regional Studies, Frederick Community College

Historic African-American Churches in Frederick County

Dean Herrin and Paul Shackel

Catoctin Center for Regional Studies, Frederick Community College

Geographic Information System Cultural Resource Database

Erve Chambers

University of Maryland

Tourism on the Eastern  Shore, Maryland (2 Graduate Teaching Assistants)

Erve Chambers and Michael Paolisso

University of Maryland

Proposal development related to heritage resources in the Chance/Deal Island communities

Judith Freidenberg

University of Maryland

Proposal development for the Anthropology of Immigrant Life

Mark Leone

University of Maryland

Proposal development for Wye Island, FIPSE, MHT, and MHC

Mark Leone

University of Maryland

Proposal development for the Fund for the Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE)

Mark Leone

University of Maryland

Proposal development for the Maryland Historical Trust

Mark Leone

University of Maryland

Proposal development for the Maryland Humanities Council

Edvard Thorsett and Erve Chambers

Shenandoah University—Shenandoah Center for Heritage and Environment

Proposal development for a public archive and interpretive center at the Avtex Site

 

 

Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Awards

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The Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Awards are provided annually by the MHT to help foster research into Maryland Heritage.  This past year, two awards were given to University of Maryland Anthropology graduate students (Table 3).  These awards strengthen the Center’s partnership and affiliate relationship and enhance our research endeavors.

Table 3.  Maryland Historical Trust Heritage Awards

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Graduate Student

Institution

Project

Sara Rivers

Maryland Historical Trust

Providing archaeological context for the Hermitage at Monocacy National Battlefield

Mary Ruiz

Maryland Historical Trust

The battle that saved Washington:  a field survey at Monocacy National Battlefield

 

 

Continuing Education Programs

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The Center offers a variety of continuing education courses for professionals through our partner organizations and departments.  We are continually seeking to expand our course offerings (including a possible certificate training program).  Our past courses and upcoming courses that have already been scheduled are listed in Table 4.

Table 4.  Past and Scheduled Continuing Education Courses

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Host Organization

Course

Date

Location

Society for American Archaeology

Geographic Information Systems

April 2001

New Orleans

Society for American Archaeology

Writing and Managing Federal Contracts

April 2001

New Orleans

Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage

Archaeology and Heritage in Flanders, Belgium:  A Multi-Disciplinary European Past

July-August 2001

Flanders, Belgium

(Upcoming courses)

 

 

 

Society for American Archaeology

People Management

March 2002

Denver, CO

Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage

Archaeology and Heritage in Flanders, Belgium:  A Multi-Disciplinary European Past

July-August 2002

Flanders, Belgium

Wye River Grant (People-to-People Exchange Program

Shared Heritage and Conflict Resolution

Summer 2002

University of Maryland

 

 

 

 

In addition to helping the Center fulfill its mission, all of the research projects, assistantship programs, and education courses listed above also serve to provide a funding stream for the Center.  We are continually looking to expand all of these activities to help broaden the reach of the Center’s intellectual and educational opportunities.

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Appendix A:  Ten objectives for the Center

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The Washington, D.C. area has perhaps the largest concentration of anthropologists in the United States, although individual position and job titles might not readily reflect their anthropological background.  Anthropologists are employed in various capacities in universities, colleges, non-profit and non-governmental organizations, and federal, state, and local agencies.  Located in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Maryland–College Park, the Center for Heritage Resource Studies has solid institutional support.  In turn, the Center gives our department a higher profile while providing a basis from which to construct better and stronger partnerships with professionals in other institutions and organizations.  These partnerships will provide increased opportunities and better support for the training of students in our graduate program.  Conversely, the Center will provide outside professionals with increased continuing education opportunities for themselves while also providing opportunities for joint sponsorship or conduct of heritage research projects.

Following are ten specific objectives for the Center for 2000 through 2003.

1.       Create an Advisory Board

We will create an Advisory Board of leading professionals from private and public organizations that have similar interests and expertise in heritage resource studies.  The purposes of the Advisory Board are to assist with

(a)     Center planning and structuring and personnel and funding needs;

(b)     Identification of programs, projects, and courses the Center should offer; and

(c)     Identification of  short- and long-term fund-raising opportunities (grants, contracts, individual and institutional support, etc.).

Having these professionals on our Advisory Board also will increase our professional network and will enhance the Center’s profile within the heritage resource community.

2.       Hold an Inaugural Event

Within the first year, the Center will host a symposium as an inaugural event to announce the Center, its staff, objectives, and current projects to the academic and professional community.  This symposium will include outside speakers who are highly visible and well respected in the heritage and resource management fields.  The event will be designed to inform the academic and professional community that the Center is, and intends to be, a key player in the international field of heritage resource studies.

3.       Develop Post-Graduate Education Programs

The Center will develop a series of continuing education courses to be given both on-site, on-line, and off-campus that cover a range of heritage resource topics and issues.  These courses (some of which have already been developed and presented) will deal with heritage management, tourism and resource management, museum interpretation, curation, and conservation, among others topics.  Given the large number of professional anthropologists in the Washington, D.C. area, a large market exists for the post-graduate education courses.  “Refresher courses” often are needed or desired by employees in public and private organizations to keep them abreast of changing issues and technologies related to resource management.  Focus groups will be developed by the Center to determine specific needs among the area’s heritage resource professionals.

Currently, the Society for American Archaeology has a very strong continuing education program that services K-12.  The Center plans to partner with the Society for American Archaeology and jointly develop post-graduate education courses for professionals.  Many professionals in the Washington, D.C. area already have indicated there is a strong need for post-graduate education for their employees, and the Center is positioned to take a leadership role in this area.  In addition, these courses will be made available to graduate students in the UM-Department of Anthropology, helping the Department upgrade its selection of graduate courses.

4.       Develop and Expand GIS Laboratory

A GIS laboratory has been established in the Department of Anthropology for the Historic District of Annapolis.  The GIS Laboratory currently is working in partnership with the Maryland State Highways Archaeology Program to create predictive models for archaeological site locations.  The Center plans to expand our efforts and work with other offices within the State Highways Division in order to expand our GIS program.

The GIS laboratory also will seek to develop other partnerships with private, non-profit organizations, and state and federal agencies to enable us to provide similar services in other areas of resource management.  Thus, the development of the GIS laboratory will serve several functions.  First, it will help expand the range of heritage resource studies and services offered by the Center; second, it will help build a revenue stream through its contracted services; and third, it will serve as a teaching laboratory for certain Center post-graduate education courses.

5.       Expand Relationship with the National Park Service

Currently, the Department of Anthropology has cooperative agreements with the National Park Service, National Capital Region, Valley Forge Cultural Resource Center, and Gettysburg Military Park.  These cooperative agreements generate significant funds and employ a large number of our undergraduate and graduate students.  We plan to develop additional partnerships with the National Park Service’s Archaeology and Ethnography Division and other surrounding national parks.  Given the National Park Service’s central federal role in cultural resource management and their existing programs for providing international assistance, expansion of the existing partnerships with the NPS will substantially assist the Center in fulfilling its goals.

6.       Expand Relationships with Private Organizations

This past fall, the Center developed a partnership with URS Corporation (an international private corporation with offices in the Washington, D.C. area) and co-wrote a proposal to undertake a large-scale archaeology project in the region.  As part of this proposal, URS Corporation intended to share resources and expertise with the Center and to employ University of Maryland students on projects.  While the URS/Center partnership was not awarded this contract, we are encouraged that, in the future, such an arrangement with a private corporation will be positive for the growth and development of the Center.  The Center intends to explore partnerships with other private companies in the region (e.g., Berger & Associates) to provide greater access to research projects and expand training opportunities for professionals and students.

7.       Expand Relationships with Public Organizations

The cultural models research project on the Eastern Shore, currently being conducted by the Center, has initiated collaboration with a number of local- and state-level organizations that directly and indirectly work on heritage issues.  Among these collaborators are the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Worcester County Tourism Office, the Lower Eastern Shore Heritage Committee, the Delmarva Folklife Project, and the Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury State University.  These organizations provide excellent opportunities to link heritage, tourism, and cultural valuation of natural resources in ongoing, community-based programs.

Students interested in resource management have interned and/or been employed by the State of Maryland’s Department of Tourism and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Students also have served NGOs and local museums devoted to the conservation of heritage resources.  The Center will continue to foster and refine these relationships to enhance the opportunities offered by the Center in terms of research and education.

8.       Expand Relationships with Regional Tourism Organizations

With renewed state and federal support for the development of heritage tourism, the Center plans to develop associations and partnerships with local public and private tourism organizations.  Such organizations may include state and local tourism boards, travel and tour operators, and other heritage organizations, such as the DC Heritage Tourism Coalition.  These relationships are expected to generate new research opportunities and provide additional opportunities for graduate students.

9.       Develop Partnerships with International Groups and Organizations

Heritage management is a world-wide movement, thus the Center intends to take advantage of this phenomenon by establishing international links.  We currently are discussing a partnership with the Ename Center, a consortium of members in the European Union that promotes public archaeology and heritage management.  Located in the province of East Flanders, Belgium, the group is dedicated to developing new technologies to interpret national heritage sites.  This partnership is being designed to include an exchange program for graduate students and professionals.  We also hope to partner with the Ename Center to work on the development of public outreach and educational programs.  In addition, similar organizations in other countries will be sought out for potential partnerships.

10.   Dissemination and Outreach

 In order for the Center to stay visible within the heritage and resource management community, staff members will create a site on the World Wide Web with a range of information on available online.  The web page will include a description of the Center (its mission, staff, research projects, partnerships, and course offerings, etc.) along with a periodic e-newsletter that includes information on important events and projects and current issues related to specific heritage resource topics and broader heritage resource issues.

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Appendix B:  Advisory Workshops

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies held two advisory workshops during 2001 with participants from the academic community (September workshop) and professional, governmental, and non-profit organizations (December workshop).  These workshops helped solidify the Center’s mission statement, organize the Center’s various programs into discrete categories, and develop a draft five-year plan for fulfilling the Center’s mission and objectives.

September Workshop (Academic Community)

The Center for Heritage Resource Studies hosted its first Advisory Workshop September 6-7, 2001.  The Advisory Workshop was held in Room 1115 of the Maryland Inn and Conference Center on the University of Maryland—University College campus in College Park.  Center staff and visiting scholars from other universities attended the workshop to assist the Center in refining its mission statement, goals, objectives, and structure, and to assist with the development of a detailed approach, or plan, to achieve these goals.

Invited participants

·   Ben Blount (Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia);

·   Peter Brosius (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, The University of Georgia);

·    Anabel Ford (Director, ISBER/MesoAmerican Research Center, University of California—Santa Barbara); and

·    Mary Hufford (Director, Center for Folklore and Ethnography, University of Pennsylvania).

University of Maryland participants

·    Stewart Edelstein (Associate Dean);

·   Paul Shackel (Director)

·   Don Jones (Assistant Director)

·   Erve Chambers (Professor)

·   Mark Leone (Professor)

·   Michael Paolisso (Assistant Professor); and

·   Anthropology graduate students Kris Beadenkopf, Stacy Hockett,
Teresa Moyer, Rosemary Riel, Sara Rivers, and Kate Shaffer.

The Advisory Workshop participants were provided with packets of information that included the Center brochure; the Center mission statement, goals, objectives, existing programs, current research projects, and staff; and information on the University of Maryland’s graduate program in Applied Anthropology.  The participants also received an agenda for the workshop, which spelled out the objectives and a series of six questions for consideration throughout the workshop.

The primary objective for the workshop was to reach consensus on the following:

·   Mission statement for the Center;

·   Defined role for the Center in the field of heritage resources
(research, continuing education, outreach, etc.); and

·   Define structure (in terms of personnel, funding mechanisms,
research projects, partnerships, and affiliate program).

To this end, the following questions were posed for consideration and discussion:

1.   “Heritage” has become an important, much employed concept.  How is the term being used, how is using this term, and to what ends?

2.   What are the implications of regarding heritage as a resource?

3.   Given the strong public interest in the idea of heritage, what are the unique intellectual, methodological, and practical (i.e., applied) contributions to be made by anthropologists?

4.   Is a critical approach to the idea of heritage and “heritage development” antithetical to the notion of working with those who are involved in the “heritage business” (i.e., tourism, museums, community development)?

5.   What are the social and political implications of heritage development?  Should it be used for social and political purposes?  To what extent?

6.   What are the major works (areas) in heritage and heritage development today?  In what direction is heritage going and where should it go?

The Center’s first Advisory Workshop generated lively discussion and debate on heritage issues and various roles the Center may serve in the field of heritage studies.  In addition, the participants assisted with the development of a proposed five-year plan for the Center.  A report on the workshop subsequently was compiled and submitted to all workshop participants.

Second Advisory Workshop (Applied)

A second advisory workshop was held December 7, 2001, also at the University Inn and Conference Center.  The Advisory Workshop was held in Room 1115 of the Maryland Inn and Conference Center on the University of Maryland—University College campus in College Park.  Center staff and visiting scholars from other universities attended the workshop to assist the Center in refining its mission statement, goals, objectives, and structure, and to assist with the development of a detailed approach, or plan, to achieve these goals.The participants invited to this workshop were individuals who work in various applied anthropology and heritage fields.  As with the first workshop, the participants were invited to assist the Center in refining its role in the field of heritage resource studies and to defining specific programs the Center should offer.

Invited participants

·   Michael Cernea (Social Development, The World Bank);

·   Elaine Eff (Maryland Historical Trust);

·   Barbara Franco (The Historical Society of Washington, DC);

·   Randall Mason (Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, University of Maryland);

·   Frank McManamon (Archeology and Ethnography Program, National Park Service); and

·   George Smith (Southeast Archeology Center, National Park Service).

University of Maryland participants

·   Stewart Edelstein (Associate Dean);

·   Paul Shackel (Center Director);

·   Don Jones (Center Assistant Director);

·   Erve Chambers (Professor, Department of Anthropology);

·   Mark Leone (Professor, Department of Anthropology);

·   Michael Paolisso (Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology); and

·   UMD Anthropology graduate students Jennifer Babiarz, Brandon Bies, Joanna Church,
Stacey Hockett, Rosemary Riel, Amanda Ritchie, and Kathryn Shaffer.

The primary objective for the workshop remained the same as the first workshop, but different questions were posed, reflecting the applied experiences of the participants and the organizations with which they are affiliated.  These questions were:

1.   How can conceptualization of heritage be used to promote community development and a shared sense of place, history, tradition, etc.?

2.   What is the range of methodological approaches currently in use to elicit from community members the cultural construct of “heritage”?

3.   What niches could a Heritage Center model fill?

4.   What are the programmatic options (e.g., fundraising, outreach, case studies) for integrating archaeological and cultural analyses of heritage?

5.   What training/education requirements could the Center fulfill?

6.   How could the Center better capitalize on its relationships with local, state, and federal organizations and what are the important points-of-contact that need to be established by the Center?

As with the first workshop, these questions generated lively discussion and debate on heritage issues and various roles the Center may serve in the field of heritage studies.  In addition, the participants assisted with the development of a list of priorities toward the development of a five-year plan for the Center.  A report on the workshop is in preparation and will be submitted to all workshop participants upon its completion.

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Appendix C:  Shared Heritage and Conflict Resolution

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The Center for Heritage Resource Studies is currently working on a project through the Wye River People-to-People Exchange Program (a U.S. State Department grant through the Wye River Foundation) to develop and implement a training course on issues of “shared heritage and conflict resolution.”  The course is being designed using local and regional examples of shared heritage projects in Maryland and Greater Washington, DC.  The course will provide a plan for cross-cultural education and community involvement in the development of historical and archaeological sites.  The Wye River project is entitled

Recognizing and Preserving the Common Heritage of Israel and the Palestinian National Authority:
A Plan for Cross-Cultural Education and Community Involvement
in the Development of Historical and Archaeological Sites.

The project is a joint effort of the University of Haifa and the Palestinian Association for Cultural Exchange in cooperation with American (Center for Heritage Resource Studies) and European (Ename Center) partner organizations.  The goal of the project is to formulate and implement a comprehensive cross-cultural educational program in archaeology for Israeli and Palestinian professionals and community members.  The project focuses on sites in Israel and in Palestinian areas that are of importance to both Arab and Jewish cultures.  The project has three main objectives:

1.   To develop a cross-cultural archaeological curriculum for Jewish and Palestinian participants;

2.   To implement that curriculum in a model program and utilize program participants as community liaisons in the presentation of workshops, facilitation of community discussions, and the recording of community oral histories about archaeological sites; and

3.   To develop and begin implementation of a plan to involve the community in the preservation and presentation of these sites.

The Center for Heritage Resource Studies will accomplish Phase One of this project:  a two-week training course on shared heritage offered at the University of Maryland for 12 Palestinian and Israeli archaeologists and community members.  The course will examine how various aspects of the past have been studied and are interpreted to the public, and how research and public interpretation can be designed to promote cross-cultural understanding and respect.  The training course will focus on local and regional sites in Maryland and Greater Washington, DC that have addressed such issues as African-American heritage, industrial labor history, and civil rights.

Upon completion of the training course, the Center proposes to publish a guidebook outlining the training curriculum, describing various approaches to the study of shared heritage in this region, and assessing varying degrees of success of the local and regional sample projects.  Such a publication would prove useful to a wide audience, including individuals and organizations involved in archaeological research, historic preservation, community development, heritage tourism, an education (particularly history, social studies, and geography, among other fields) throughout the world.

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Appendix D:  Belgium Study Abroad Program 2002

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In Summer 2001, the Center for Heritage Resource Studies and the Department of Anthropology at the University of Maryland offered a very successful study abroad course in Belgium in cooperation with the Ename Center for Public Archaeology and Heritage Presentation and the Instituet voot her Archeologisch Patrimonium in Belgium.  The course is being expanded for Summer 2002 to include more sites in the region and to accommodate a larger number of students.

Ename is a unique archaeological site where parts of the medieval world have been discovered and preserved.  Ename’s past is presented to the public through an archaeological park, a unique architectural monument, and a state-of-the-art community museum.  The Center will offer a six-credit intensive course surveying the rich and varied archaeological and historic heritage of Flanders, Belgium, and its multi-cultural European past through archaeology, historical texts, art and architecture, public interpretation and presentation, and tourism.

The course will explore Flanders’ heritage through investigations in archaeology, historical texts, art and architecture, public interpretation and presentation, and tourism.  The course will involve hands-on excavation at the premier medieval site at Ename, visits to nearby medieval churches and monasteries, and tours of historic battlefields at Flanders Field and Waterloo to explore different approaches to heritage interpretation and presentation to the public.  The course will conclude with an investigation of heritage tourism issues using a visit to the historic city of Bruges as a case study.

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Appendix E:  Center Brochure and Website

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The Center for  Heritage Resource Studies develop and printed a 4-page fold-out brochure that describes broadly the Center’s mission, partners, and activities.  Based on the and expanding from the brochure, the Center has launched its new site on the World Wide Web, offering virtual visitors information on heritage issues, the Center’s research and programmatic focus on heritage resource studies, links to our partner organizations and affiliate members, and several other features.  The Center’s new web address is

www.heritage.umd.edu

a domain name that instantly ties the concept of “heritage” to the University of Maryland.  The entrance page of the website is illustrated on the following page.

We are currently in the process of advertising the site by registering the domain name with various search engines and publicizing the site through an email campaign.  The Center website will provide the foundation for Center programs, such as the debate forum and certain on-line educational activities, and will also serve to enhance our public outreach efforts.  For example, we are exploring the idea of hosting a “heritage list-serve” for the academic and professional communities and using a portion of the website for a periodic e-newsletter.  In addition, graduate and post-graduate educational opportunities are listed and summaries of recent and on-going heritage resource projects being conducted by Center staff and faculty are provided.

The Center website has other features, such as the monthly “Heritage Spotlight” series that is expected to become popular with a world-wide audience, and a section on “Mid-Atlantic Regional Tourism” that will focus more locally on community-based heritage and ecotourism issues.  Both of these features are expected to help generate repeat visitation to the Center website and enhance our public outreach efforts.

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