MAA Internships

CHRS HOME

EDUCATION

Continuing Ed
MAA Program
MAA Internships

PROGRAMS

Forum
Research
Education
Outreach

The University of Maryland's
Masters in Applied Anthropology Program provides excellent opportunities for graduate student internships.

 

A few of these internships are highlighted below.  A complete listing can be found on the MAA Program's website.

bullet

Resource Management and Cultural Process

bullet

Historical Archaeology

bullet

Biological Anthropology

 

Click on one of the links above for a specific research track
or just scroll down the page for a list of past internships.

horizontal rule

Resource Management and Cultural Process

TOP OF PAGE

Wu-Lung Chin (2001) interned at Moss Rehabilitation Hospital (Travel Information Services for Disabled People).  His internship goal was to promote discussion and strengthen awareness and education between government, industry organizations, and people with disabilities.  Ethnographic methods were used to gain insight into the travel experience of people with disabilities.  The results  were compared with mainstream (not disabled) people. 

M. Alejandra Colom (2001) came to the program with interests in community level natural resource management and international environmental policy.  During her participation in the MAA program, she interned with the U.S. Agency for International Development's (USAID) Office of Transitional Initiatives in East Timor, where she assisted with research related to rebuilding the social infrastructure of that country.  She also participated in a campus program in which she conducted demographic field research in Rajasthan, India.  Alejandra is currently employed as an ethnographer at Friends Research Institute in Baltimore, where she is working on a project related to the treatment of adolescent substance abuse.

Aaron Dabbah (1997) was part of the design team on the Kovno Ghetto Special Exhibition at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, which opened in July 1997.  He focused specifically on how knowledge was constructed, offering an applied anthropological perspective on the content of the exhibit.  His activities covered oral histories, photo selection, and historical and cultural research.  He was also an independent consultant for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.  Aaron is pursuing a Ph.D. in the Philosophy of Religion with a focus on the cultural construction of ontology and epistemology.

R. Shawn Maloney (1996) conducted his internship with the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development Office.  His work involved the creation, implementation, and analysis of a joint Department of Business and Economic Development/Department of Housing and Community Development study entitled "Economic Impact of Heritage Museum Funding."  The purpose of the study was to gather data to be used to support an increase in state funding for heritage museums.  Her currently is a Research Coordinator for the Anthropology of Pfiesteria Project at the University of Maryland.

Amanda Mason (2000) started the program with interests in cultural tourism and the relationships between tourism and natural and cultural resource protection, cultural exchanges, and economic improvement.  She completed an internship with Adirondack Architectural Heritage, a non-profit organization in New York State, where she worked as an ethnographer and tour guide at an historical Adirondack camp.  Amanda is currently employed as a Program Associate with the Western Erie Canal Heritage Corridor Planning Commission (click HERE for more info), where she is responsible for the development of a natural and cultural resources management plan, to include tourism development, for this heritage corridor.

Jennifer Matter (2000) entered the program with an interest in tourism related to ecotourism and primate conservation.  She completed her internship in Bali, Indonesia, at the Wanara Wana Monkey Forest Sanctuary (click HERE for more info),  where she studied community approaches to sustainable tourism and wildlife protection.  During her last year in the program, Jennifer completed a second internship with the Ecotourism Department at Conservation International's Washington, DC office.  She is currently employed as Volunteer Coordinator at Mount Rainer National Park.

D. Sydney Reddy (1997) conducted an internship with the U.S. State Department, working with the Office of Marine Conservation in the Bureau of Oceans, International Environment, and Scientific Affairs.  His responsibilities included assisting with research and implementation of the U.S. government's policies regarding the conservation of fisheries throughout the world.  He also provided an analysis of the breakdown of negotiations with Inuit Greenlanders on the subject of salmon conservation in the North Atlantic.

Amanda Ritchie (2001) has professional interests in international development, conservation and natural resource management, food security, and practicing anthropology.  She completed here MAA internship in Honduras with Vecinos Mundiales (World Neighbors) assisting in the systematization of programming and project activities in rural development.  She also participated in the campus program in Rajasthan, India, and served as a researcher at the World Resources Institute and as a consultant with the International Center for Research on Women.  Upon graduating from the program, Amanda worked for the United Nations World Food Programme, participating in survey research in Honduras, El Salvador, Columbia, and Ethiopia.  She is currently employed as Research Coordinator for the Department of Anthropology's NSF/EPA sponsored project on Cultural Models of Environment and Pollution on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Kathryn Schaffer (2000) worked with the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and World Neighbors Honduras on a Promoting Women in Development (PROWID) project entitled "Integrating Gender into Natural Resource Management in El Chile, Honduras."  She assisted with the organization, collection, and analysis of field data collected on men's and women's time allocation, resource use, and reaction to Hurricane Mitch.  She currently is working towards publishing a synthesis paper on theory and praxis of Gender, Environment, and Development.

Andrea Sincoff (1992) conducted her internship at the Office of Conservation and Management in the National Marine Fisheries Service, a division of the National Oceanographic and Aerospace Administration (NOAA).  She assisted with the preparation of Social Impact Assessment, compiled census data and demographics and information on ethnicity, and reviewed literature, and prepared profiles on the importance of and cultural dependence on subsistence for Native Americans.  She is currently working as a personnel trainer at the Montgomery County Department of Transportation.

Shoshanna Sumka (2000) conducted her internship at the Experiment in International Living office in Quito, Ecuador.  She worked with students and host families during a summer-abroad high school program.  Looking at host/guest relationships, cross-cultural communication, and impacts of tourism on host communities, she examined whether study abroad increases global understanding between people of different cultures and nationalities.

Mark Wamsley (1999) interned at the Office of Sustainable Ecosystems and Communities at the US Environmental Protection Agency, where he explored the relevance of social science research and application for environmental policy.  Through a review of documents and interviews with mid- and senior-level EPA managers, Mark produced the white paper "The Social Sciences and Environmental Protection:  Experiences and Opportunities at the US EPA."  The document is intended to both educate and help expand social science use at the EPA.  Mark simultaneously completed an internship with the Anthropology of Pfiesteria Program, with funding from the SfAA/EPA cooperative agreement.  He is currently employed as a social science researcher with the Vera Institute in New York  City.

TOP OF PAGE

horizontal rule

Historical Archaeology

Joy Beasley (2001) conducted her internship with the National Park Service.  During the summer of 2000, she performed a Phase I survey of Pittsylvania, a plantation within the boundaries of Manassas National Battlefield Park.  Whereas interpretation at the park has always focused on the two Confederate victories during the Civil War, her research records the lives of planters, merchants, and enslaved people who lived there before, during, and after the war.  She was the recipient of the George M. Philips Award (2001) for outstanding research involving community and public concerns and she received an award (2001) from the American Association for University Women for outstanding Masters student.  She is currently directing an archaeological survey project at Monocacy National Battlefield Park.

Stephen R. Bilicki (1996) interned with the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO).  He conducted a survey of underwater archaeology activities in coastal and Great Lakes states for the purpose of collection program information from those who have to deal with submerged cultural resource issues.  The comparison information gathered by this survey was then followed up by a synthesis, which was distributed to participating SHPOs.

Thomas Bodor (1994) conducted an internship with Archaeology in Annapolis, supervising excavations as part of a cultural resource survey and inventory of the United States Naval Academy (USNA).  This project was funded by a grant from the Legacy Resource Management Program, which was organized under the Department of Defense (click HERE for more info).  The results of this work will provide the Navy with a planning document that will assist with the preservation of cultural resources now known to exist within the walls of the US Naval Academy.  He is currently a Principal Investigator with Greenhorne & O'Mara.

James Harmon (1997) conducted an internship for the US Department of the Navy and the Maryland Historical Trust.  He performed an archaeological and ethnohistorical investigation at the Posey Site, a 17th-century Native American residential occupation that functioned as a locus for the manufacture of trade gods.  His internship included historical research, fieldwork, and artifact analysis.  He is currently working as an Archaeological Consultant in the private sector and is pursuing a Ph.D. in the Department of Geography at the University of Maryland-College Park.

Dana Holland (1991) conducted her internship with the National Park Service.  She developed a traveling exhibit on Manassas National Battlefield Park, Harpers Ferry National Historic Site, and Antietam National Battlefield.  She utilized critical theory to display current historic archaeological research projects interactively to provoke critical thinking.  One of her papers was published in the National Park Service's CRM Bulletin.  She also worked as a Research Associate with Science Learning, Inc., a consulting firm working on museum audience response projects for the National Gallery of Art and the Smithsonian Institution.  She currently teaches English in Korea.

Lynn Jones (1993) worked as an assistant to Dr. Barbara J. Little at Dames & Moore (now part of URS), an environmental and cultural resource management firm.  Her internship involved work on a contract for the State of Georgia's Department of Transportation.  She helped plan and supervise a Phase I archaeological and historic structures survey along 60 miles of highway in southwest Georgia.  She also prepared the historic structures report for submission to the client.  After earning a Ph.D. in American Studies at the University of Maryland, she became the Staff Archaeologist for the Historic Annapolis Foundation.

Hannah Kaiser (1992) worked in conjunction with the Archaeology in Annapolis Project compiling oral histories of African American family life in Annapolis, Maryland.  She produced a brochure for an exhibit at the Shiplap House Museum, entitled "The Maryland Black Experience as Understood Through Archaeology," which incorporated excerpts of oral histories.  She earned a Ph.D. from City University of New York and currently teaches an ethnographic field school on oral histories for  the Archaeology in Annapolis Project.

Erika Martin (1998) conducted her internship with the National Park Service and the University of Maryland.  She completed a minimum vessel analysis for the Robinson House, a free African-American site occupied from 1840 through 1930 on Manassas National Battlefield Park.  The park will reinterpret the site, using the material culture and vessel analysis to add to the information on the lives of free African-Americans in the Manassas/Bull Run area.

Sharon Ann (Sam) McCarthy (1995) conducted her internship with the Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in St. Leonard, Calvert County, Maryland.  She worked with audience development and completed a research profiles on current and potential audiences, focusing on African American segments of the tri-county region's population as potential audiences.  She also developed a model for use by small museums in reaching new audiences.  She currently is a Project Manager in the Archaeological Assistance Division of the National Park Service.

Matthew Palus (2000) completed a site report on interdisciplinary archaeological investigations at several sites at Harpers Ferry National Historic Park in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia.  His work focused on domestic sites in a 19th-century industrial community called Virginius Island.  His analysis shows how the health and wealth of the community steadily declined as the area became more industrialized.  Matt is currently working toward a Ph.D. at Columbia University.

Kirsti Uunila (1996) interned with the Maryland Historical Trust and the Chief of the Archaeology Division.  Her  worked involved monitoring legislation concerning burials and repatriation issues in Maryland.  She is currently the Historic Preservation Specialist at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum in Calvert County, Maryland.

TOP OF PAGE

horizontal rule

Biological Anthropology

Allison Davis (1998) conducted an internship at Howard University on the New York African Burial Ground Project (or NYABG--see the GSA's project website).  She conducted research for development of an ethical protocol for dealing with African American anthropological sites like NYABG and assisted in synthesizing the project data for wider public consumption.

Tara Goodrich Tetrault (1997) conducted an ethnoarchaeological field project identifying pottery associated with the Elmina Site, Ghana, West Africa (click HERE for more info).  The goal of the fieldwork was to identify the use, manufacturing techniques, and connections contemporary pottery may have with the vessel forms found at the Elmina Site.  This internship was undertaken in order to learn about African material culture and it relations to American material culture.  Tara gained experience running her own international field project and learning about African and African American archaeology.  She is currently working towards publishing the project data. 

TOP OF PAGE

horizontal rule